New FICTION

“The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek,” by Kim Michele Richardson. Cussy Mary Carter is the last of her kind, her skin the color of a blue damselfly in these dusty hills. But that doesn’t mean she’s got nothing to offer. As a member of the Pack Horse Library Project, Cussy delivers books to the hill folk of Troublesome, hoping to spread learning in these desperate times. But not everyone is so keen on Cussy’s family or the Library Project, and the hardscrabble Kentuckians are quick to blame a Blue for any trouble in their small town. 

“Buckskin,” by Robert Knott. After marshals Virgil Cole and Everett Hitch lay Appaloosa’s sheriff to rest, an emerging handful of men eagerly vie for the deceased sheriff’s vacant office. No sooner are various campaigns underway when gold is discovered outside of town and two mining factions square off over the claim. And on the eve of the new sheriff’s appointment, a snowstorm blankets Appaloosa. As the town braces for the severe weather, Cole and Hitch’s problems multiply with the emergence of anonymous letters to the editor of the Appaloosa Star, leading the duo to a series of murders and the pursuit of a vicious serial killer.

“The Daughter’s Tale,” by Armando Lucas Correa. The dreams that Amanda Sternberg and her husband, Julius, had for their daughters are shattered when the Nazis descend on Berlin, burning down their bookshop and sending Julius to a concentration camp. Desperate to save her children, Amanda flees toward to France. Along the way, a ship headed for Cuba offers another chance at escape and there, at the dock, Amanda is forced to make a choice that will haunt her for the rest of her life. Decades later, 80-year-old Elise Duval receives a call from a woman bearing messages from a time she forced herself to forget. A French Catholic who arrived in New York after World War II, Elise is shocked to discover that the letters were from her mother, written in German during the war. Despite Elise’s best efforts to stave off her past, seven decades of secrets begin to unravel.

 

New NONFICTION

“Things My Son Needs to Know About the World,” by Fredrik Backman. As he conveys his awe at experiencing all the “firsts” that fill him with wonder and catch him completely unprepared, Backman doesn’t shy away from revealing his own false steps and fatherly flaws, tackling issues both great and small, from masculinity and midlife crises to practical jokes and poop. In between the sleep-deprived lows and wonderful highs, Backman shares the true story of falling in love with a woman who is his complete opposite, and learning to live a life that revolves around the people you care about unconditionally. Alternating between humorous sidenotes and longer essays offering his son advice as he grows up, Backman relays the big and small lessons in life. 

“Ghosts of Gold Mountain: The Epic Story of the Chinese Who Built the Transcontinental Railroad,” by Gordon H. Chang. From across the sea, they came by the thousands, escaping war and poverty in China to seek their fortunes in America. Converging on the western work site of the Transcontinental Railroad, the migrants spent years dynamiting tunnels through the snow-packed cliffs of the Sierra Nevada and laying tracks across the burning Utah desert. Their sweat and blood fueled the ascent of an interlinked, industrial United States. 

 

Story Time

Story time is held Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m. and lasts 45–60 minutes. Participants read books, followed by a craft or activity. 

 

Chetek Library hours

Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Tuesday, Thursday: 1–6 p.m.; and Saturday: 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.