New FICTION

“My Life as a Rat,” by Joyce Carol Oates. Violet Rue Kerrigan looks back upon her life in exile from her family following her testimony, at age 12, concerning what she knew to be the racist murder of an African-American boy by her older brothers. In a succession of vividly recalled episodes, Violet contemplates the circumstances of her life as the initially beloved youngest child of seven Kerrigan children who inadvertently “informs” on her brothers, setting into motion their arrests and convictions and her own long estrangement.

“The Summer of Sunshine and Margot,” by Susan Mallery. As an etiquette coach, Margot teaches her clients to fit in. But she’s never faced a client like Bianca, an aging movie star who gained fame, and notoriety, through a campaign of shock and awe. Schooling Bianca on the fine art of behaving like a proper diplomat’s wife requires intensive lessons, forcing Margot to move into the mansion owned by the actress’ son. Sunshine has always been the good-time sister, abandoning jobs to chase after guys who used her, then threw her away. No more. This time, she’ll finish college, dedicate herself to her job, and she 100-percent will not screw up her life again by falling for the wrong guy. 

“Enemy Contact,” by Mike Maden. The CIA’s deepest secrets are being given away for a larger agenda that will undermine the entire Western intelligence community. Director of National Intelligence Mary Pat Foley wants it stopped, but doesn’t know who, how or why. Jack Ryan Jr. is dispatched to Poland on a different mission. The clues are thin, and the sketchy trail dead-ends in a harrowing fight from which he barely escapes with his life. If that’s not bad enough, Jack gets more tragic news. An old friend, who’s dying from cancer, has one final request for Jack. It seems simple enough, but before it’s done, Jack will find himself alone, his life hanging by a thread. If he survives, he’ll be one step closer to finding the shadowy figure behind the CIA leak and its true purpose, but in the process, he’ll challenge the world’s most dangerous criminal syndicate with devastating consequences.

 

New LARGE PRINT

“The Abolitionist’s Daughter,” by Diane C. McPhail. On a Mississippi morning in 1859, Emily Matthews begs her father to save a slave, Nathan, about to be auctioned away from his family. Judge Matthews is an abolitionist who runs an illegal school for his slaves, hoping to eventually set them free. One, a woman named Ginny, has become Emily’s companion and often her conscience, and understands all too well the hazards an educated slave must face. Yet even Ginny could not predict the tangled, tragic string of events set in motion as Nathan’s family arrives at the Matthews farm. A young doctor, Charles Slate, tends to injured Nathan and begins to court Emily, finally persuading her to become his wife. But their union is disrupted by a fatal clash and a lie that will tear two families apart. 

“The Parade,” by Dave Eggers. Four and Nine are partners, working for the same company, sent without passports to a nation recovering from 10 years of civil war. Together, operating under pseudonyms and anonymous to potential kidnappers, they are given a new machine, the RS-90, and tasked with building a highway that connects the country’s far-flung villages with the capital. Four is one of the company’s most experienced operators, never falling short of his assigned schedule. He drives the RS-90, stopping only to sleep and eat the food provided by the company. But Nine is an agent of chaos: speeding ahead on his vehicle, chatting and joking with locals, eating at nearby bars, he threatens the schedule, breaks protocol, and endangers the work that they must complete in time for a planned government parade.

 

Story Time

Story time is held Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m. and lasts 45–60 minutes. Participants read books, followed by a craft or activity. 

 

Chetek Library hours

Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Tuesday, Thursday: 1–6 p.m.; and Saturday: 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

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