In a speech to the Republican Women of Greater Wisconsin, Sen. Ron Johnson falsely and robustly denied climate change. I am appalled that his habitual statements continue to mislead his U.S. constituents whereas 65 percent of Americans are concerned about this crisis urging the federal government to do more.

The senator may not be aware of the World Weather Attribution Study which concluded that the Pacific Northwest heat wave “would be virtually impossible without human-caused climate change.” These extreme temperatures in late June killed hundreds of people in Oregon and Washington. Climate change is real.

A recent draft report from The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a United Nations body of scientists, asserts: “Species extinction, more widespread disease, unlivable heat, ecosystem collapse, cities affected by rising seas—and other devastating climate impacts are accelerating and bound to become painfully obvious before a child born today turns 30.”

Because climate change is human-caused, we can reduce its effects. To do so, bipartisan political will is needed. Despite differences, there is support for several policy options intended to reduce climate change effects including a carbon fee. The new Conservative Climate Caucus in the House, the Republican-initiated bipartisan climate solution caucus in the Senate and the Democrat-led efforts are viable examples. Sen. Johnson’s positive future support could potentially honor his constituents while promoting a healthy environment for all.

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